• Ryle Eddings

A Pedacito Of Budva, Montenegro

When I first arrived in Podgorica, I was pretty worried that I had made a huge mistake in deciding to move to Montenegro for three months. Podgorica is the capital city of Montenegro, and I had heard that it is the most boring city in all of Europe.

The ballerina statue sits along the coast of Budva, Montenegro
The ballerina statue sits along the coast of Budva, Montenegro

Boring would be an understatement. Podgorica felt more like a dying town than a capital city, and although I wasn't planning to stay more than a few days, I was worried that it represented the best that Montenegro had to offer.


Luckily, I discovered that I was completely wrong when I paid the six Euros and hopped on a bus heading to Budva. As the driver took us through the winding mountain roads, my anticipation grew as I first saw Budva from a distance.


I think the easiest way to describe Budva is simply to tell you about my day, today. This morning I woke up early and took a two-hour hike through the mountains. Along the way, I passed a monastery where monks were outside in the garden having coffee and praying.

The monastery that I pass on my hike up the mountain outside of Budva
The monastery that I pass on my hike up the mountain outside of Budva

As I continued to hike up one of the multiple mountains which surround Budva, I passed by various produce and animal farms scattered throughout the landscape. Every once in a while I would stop hiking and look down at Budva and the glimmering sea below. The views were breathtaking, to say the least.

After my hike, I walked about twenty minutes from my apartment to Mogren Beach. There are many clean and pretty beaches in Budva, but it is definitely a tourist town, and the beaches get filled with traveling Russians and other Balkan tourists pretty quickly.


So, following the suggestion of a Serbian friend of mine who had been to Budva before me, I walked past the more touristy beaches, past the port filled with yachts and fishing boats, and continued along the coast.


Nestled in what looks like a cave, I crossed a rather dubious-looking wooden-planked bridge, which took me to the more secluded Mogren Beach. There, I swam in the crystal clear and slightly cool water.

The somewhat shaky hidden bridge leading to the more secluded Budva beach
The somewhat shaky hidden bridge leading to the more secluded Budva beach

The sea is especially salty here, and so it's a great place to float effortlessly while you look at the surrounding mountains. If you are hungry or thirsty, there is a small restaurant on the beach serving cocktails and sandwiches.


After coming home and doing a little work (I've got to work sometimes), I will return to the beach this afternoon where I will hire a boat taxi (between five and ten Euros depending on the boat) to take me to one of the large caves along the coast.

While in the cave, I will jump out of the boat and do some snorkeling in the clear blue water. When I return, I'll visit one of the many seafood restaurants lining the beach and eat some fish that was literally pulled from the sea an hour before I ordered it.


Not a bad day, eh?


Budva is a truly wonderful place and I consider myself lucky to be living here for a short time. I'm still baffled as to why so many tourists prefer to go to Western European countries instead of visiting the Balkans.

The crystal clear waters off the coast of Budva is a dream to swim in
The crystal clear waters off the coast of Budva is a dream to swim in

But maybe the description of a single day spent here is enough to inspire you to give Budva, Montenegro a try for yourself. Trust me, you won't be disappointed if you do.

 

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